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Aggression [How do we make the adjustment when fear takes hold?].

Huck7 Posts: 8Subscriber
edited March 25 in NLHE Strategy Discussion
To @bart and @kilee and whoever else would like to contribute…

I have an internal conflict which I am engaging as best I can but am finding it incredibly difficult to conquer.

Having just completed PreFlop 1.0 and 2.0 this is only a fraction of what I have gleaned.

Bad preflop decisions become magnified post-flop and NLHE is a game of initiative and position.

This is something I can very much attest to as I have been a losing player for a while (but hopefully not so, moving forward) and have often made bad decisions pre-flop.

Furthermore, I am normally one of the tighter players at the table. So the combination of the two = a trailing consequence.

Having said all of that, I am struggling with some of the stratagem discussed in pre-flop 1.0 and 2.0

I’m sure it’s an issue with mindset, at the very least. I don’t think it’s an issue with comprehension but could be wrong as I have so much to learn. It could be something else entirely.

I know the content within the course structure to be true because I believe in the coaches and CLP.

But I now must make the mental adjustment to implement something which I am not entirely comfortable with. Call it fear. Call it apprehension. Executing the theory when there is real money involved is binding my hands and forcing me stagnant.

A real world example…

Over the weekend I played 2/3 live for about 3.5 hours and very much wanted to (1) stick to the preflop ranges provided and (2) increase my aggression especially when in position, but also become far more aggressive with good hands when out of position.

I knew what must be done. I recognized the opportunities when they were there.

And yet I could not pull the trigger. I froze.

There was a very solid reg behind me which didn’t help matters. Average stack size at the table was $450 and this guy had 1.4k in front of him + was 3 betting light. Very aggressive. Extremely competent. All smiles and nothing but cockiness.

All that aside, I really don’t think that was the catalyst holding me back on the night.

The moments I decided to pass me by, within that minuscule sample of 3 hours, turned out to be fairly good decisions.

Or so I think. Confirmation bias is also a really hard notion to overcome.

Am I right? Am I wrong? I'm probably wrong. I say that on the night I utilized the “correct action” because my hand in no way connected with the board on almost every occasion when I did decide to fold pre.

So I’d fold pre, the board wouldn’t connect with my original holdings, and I’d breathe a sigh of relief.

“Good call Huck7”. (sarcasm)

My post flop game is just not good enough to out-battle + out-maneuver two or more callers, just yet.

Especially if the board does not connect with my two hole cards. My understanding of board texture is just not there.

So in my mind, better it be two other Villain’s calling 3bets or opening far too often and folding to a flop cbet.

I have saved money by not engaging. Right? I know it’s not right. But this is the mindset I am trying to crush.

These are just some of the holdings I did not call, 3 bet or RFI:
1. Folded 108s on the B with 3 limpers before me.
2. Folded A8s in the CO with 3 limpers in front.
(Reg behind me raised to $26 after I folded).
3. Folded AJo UTG.
4. Folded 98s in the BB to a MP open of $10
5. Called a $15 RFI (and did not 3bet) AKo in MP
(Folded flop to cbet: Q85r).
6. Folded QJo in EP with no RFI.
7. Folded A7o on the B with 2 callers to an EP $10 open
(Flop: Ac 10s Js Turn: 5d).
8. Folded AQo in MP after 3 limpers.
(Board: K72r) (so I probably would have folded to a cbet even had I opened).

Key notes: We must always enter the pot with a raise. There is a 70% chance of missing the flop with an unpaired hand. As the preflop raiser and in position we should be able to continuation bet and take down the pot a large portion of the time. We do not want to have a capped range.

My point, or my query (YES FINALLY!!!) is this…

Say all of the above holdings were changed and theoretically across the same night, Hero, in position, holds:

AJs
KJs
KQs
KQo
A10s
QJs
AJo
A5s
109s

In all honesty, I do not think I would have been able to force myself into increasing my aggression and implementing what it is I have learned. Even with the stronger holdings above.

My inner-monologue when at the table, which I am sure is incorrect.

“Hero plays a 5 hours session. Hero opens or 3bets all of the above hands across said 5 hour session. 6 of the 8 holdings above miss the flop with multiple callers. Hero is forced to fold 6 out of 8 hands above because: Villain(s) refuse to fold to c-bets by Hero (which really does happen at this casino) or the board legitimately connects with V’s range and not ours.”


6 x $15 opens (standard raising size at a 2/3 table in live casino)
= $90

This isn’t including our 3bets to $45 which do not connect with the board, or pots we do not take down after 3betting and being aggressive. We are forced to fold again and our stack is getting very small (also standard 3 bet size at a 2/3 table in my casino).

So in my mind, the fear of already being down $100-$150+ when all I’ve done is follow the correct game theory is disheartening.

I know that I am missing something. Some kind of key piece of information which has not revealed itself to me. Something which helps to make sense out of all this jumble. Perhaps I am just not far enough into the study process to understand.

It could simply be that I have never implemented the strategy and won.

You cannot be sure that you have succeeded until you have examined the result of your efforts.

Should I just throw caution to the wind and force myself to execute?

If a $300 buy-in goes the way of the wind and is lost, so be it.

(I apologize for the extended post, esp if it doesn’t make any sense).

I know I am most certainly wrong but do not know how to make the adjustment or where to go from here.


Comments

  • Chester Drafman Posts: 35Subscriber
    Wow, ok. Poker is basically a game of mathematical probabilities. Certain pre-flop decisions are mathematically positive EV. If you don’t do them, you are going to lose money. Why not be afraid of the money you are losing by not doing those things?
    Maybe you could try playing 1/3 or playing on global poker for .5 .10 9 handed. You could put your opening range is right on the screen. Just follow those pre-flop rules until you get more comfortable with doing the things that are plus EV Preflop.
  • PotLuckNeeded Posts: 53SubscriberProfessional
    "So in my mind, the fear of already being down $100-$150+ when all I’ve done is follow the correct game theory is disheartening."

    I was at MGM NH last month and witnessed 12 reds in a row (on the screen), followed by a green, 4 more reds before a black hit. My point? Crazy things happen in the short term.

    Back to poker. The charts are simply a starting point, practice and study will eventually help you understand the adjustments.

    Scared money is always dangerous. I like Chester's suggestion starting low stakes online to clean up some fundamentals.

    Best of luck.
  • Huck7 Posts: 8Subscriber
    edited March 25
    Just to clarify,

    Assume that I don't have access to online poker (because I am in Australia and I don't) .

    Assume that I don't have access to 1/2 or 1/3 live stakes (because I am in Sydney and I don't).

    I can battle PokerSnowie all day to sharpen my game but most of the time you open AQo in EP via Snowie and it
    folds right around and Hero collects the blinds each and every time. So sometimes it isn't the best tool to develop post-flop skill. It just doesn't fight back enough sometimes.

    Not to mention, when it's not real money and you aren't live there aren't any butterflies.

    I guess the crux of my question is as follows:

    If you do find yourself down a couple of hundred even though you have theoretically made
    all of the correct plays e.g.

    You have missed the board and have largely had to fold to aggression post flop because it's the correct decision.

    Someone 4bets you in late position when you've opened with QJs and you decide to fold because
    they are a nit and repping QQ+/AK

    etc...

    Do you guys just top off your stack and say "oh well, shit happens, that's poker!"

    And then get right back to grinding?

    What is going on within your minds-eye when things aren't going right or the strategy isn't holding true?

    What adjustments might you make?

    We shouldn't be calling right? We should be raising, 3betting, or folding a large portion of the time.

    What if you run bad and don't connect with the board when you ARE being aggressive?

    Do you then overlook and fold hands like QJs - 109s - A3s etc... and table those until you've built your stack up?

    Then loosen the ranges a little? Look for exploits and adjustments.

    I think the difference between a seasoned veteran and a newbie is simply that a veteran sticks with the theory and doesn't panic whereas a newbie tilts, or panics, and fumbles.

    A confirmation of sorts from the sharks among us would be appreciative :-)

    Thanks to all for contributions and analysis.

    Huck
  • PotLuckNeeded Posts: 53SubscriberProfessional
    edited March 25
    A few thoughts:

    1. That's poker is exactly it. I'm by no means able to avoid tilt, however, I actively work on it. It's very rare I adjust my strategy based on on losing hands or getting sucked out. I might tighten up a bit since my table image is bad.. that's a strategic change not emotional. Not perfect but realize this skill is huge for. winning players.

    2. I will get upset at times when I know I played a hand badly and try to shake it. If weak players river me all day, great, I'll eventually get the money as I continue to review sessions.

    3. Exploits and adjustments 100%. My strength is not technical fundamentals like beasts like Worm and Jesse the Suit. I pay attention to every hand, mentally keep a running HUD on tendencies and exploit. For me, that's far more important than stressing over specific hands.

    4. When things aren't going right? I remind myself it's just one long game. Ups/downs per session are almost pointless to me from a cash perspective. I do track it, however, my post play analysis is critical.. especially if I got smacked around a bit. I want to be honest with myself with what percentage was bad play and what percentage was unavoidable. How could I played differently etc...

    5. If you are learning the fundamentals at CrushLivePoker, posting hands and thinking through decisions at the table.. you are so far ahead of most live players at low stakes.
  • OMGitsWorm Posts: 272SubscriberProfessional
    Hey..
    I live in Australia and you can play online just fine with Ignition.
    I wish I did live in Sydney you have access to great games and they do run $2/$3 Holdem I believe $100-$500.

    Reading over this interesting thread. I feel you have some strong mental game issues that you may need to address. Google Jared Tendler and listen to his audio books and stuff on You Tube. It’s helped me.
    You might also have to come to terms with how this game work and with live poker your going to go through long stretches of raising the correct hands and missing flops and yes it does feel like your just bleeding money. It happened to me on Saturday and took me 9.5hrs to get back to even. Started $5/$5 Holdem then moved to $5/$5 PLO. But it’s part of the game and your not asking a mistake raising the correct hands. It’s just variance of poker. Also there is a big difference in my opinion opening the raise and iso raising over limpers. The way those ranges are constructed are very different.
    You need to structure you Cb strategy correctly too given the position, board texture, amount of field callers. Otherwise you will be to aggressive and bleed more money.
    Also get comfortable open bet folding pre or 3b and folding to a 4b. Once again your not bleeding money if it’s the correct hands against those players and the position your versing.

    Reading all these thoughts your having I think you need to just play more poker, embrace the grind and variance, track how you play, study the mental game as the hardest part is having a strong mind through this process to avoid any type of tilt.
  • Huck7 Posts: 8Subscriber
    @OMGitsWorm you have hit the nail right on the head good sir. The highlighted passage in the attachment from your commentary above.

    *It does feel like I'm bleeding money but in a way it's good to know that I'm not the only one who feels like that.

    We absolutely MUST "Stay the course" if we are to be successful in this poker war.
    1041 x 706 - 486K
  • Huck7 Posts: 8Subscriber
    @PotLuckNeeded

    I think this is what I found most interesting regarding your post above:

    "It's very rare I adjust my strategy based on on losing hands or getting sucked out." and

    "I might tighten up a bit since my table image is bad.. that's a strategic change not emotional."

    Boy do I have a long way to go.

    Thanks for sharing and motivating me to keep working.

    Also this paragraph:

    "I want to be honest with myself with what percentage was bad play and what percentage was unavoidable. How could I played differently etc..."

    I'm really working hard on my note-taking at the table so I can document both player tendencies and exploits (the few I can recognise for the moment) and for my own post play analysis so I can try to identify what I did wrong or what was not optimal etc...

    Easier said than done I must admit.

    Just so much to keep track of.
  • OMGitsWorm Posts: 272SubscriberProfessional
    Stay the course lol I like it
    by 1Huck7
  • Huck7 Posts: 8Subscriber
    @OMGitsWorm

    This is gold btw:

    "Also get comfortable open bet folding pre or 3b and folding to a 4b. Once again your not bleeding money if it’s the correct hands against those players and the position your versing."

    I'm going to keep working on the theory and the CLP courseware until I can assure myself that even though I folded it was the right play, at the right time, under the right conditions, and ultimately +EV
  • philc Posts: 14SubscriberProfessional
    I had the same problems over-analyzing everything a million times and being scared as shit about the money when I started playing. I'm personally still pretty new to poker and I was definitely a losing player a couple years ago when I started. I eventually cut myself off after losing a few thousand dollars in 2017. Then I found CLP last year, studied for a few months and saved up $2k to start playing with and have definitely made back everything I ever lost in the past plus a ton more since I started playing again last October (and it's been great!). So I completely see where you are coming from and it's also super recent to me (probably unlike most of the monsters on here who have been gambling with gazillions of dollars forever).

    It's important to understand that whatever money you put on the table must be OK to lose. If you buy in for 300 at 2-3 game and someone straddles to 6, you now only have 50 big blinds. This means that you have to be OK with getting it all in pre-flop with AK or QQ knowing that there's a very good possibility that you are dominated. This is a very likely scenario and you have to be confident in knowing that when you are playing a 50bb stack and are dealt QQ or AK and face a large 3 bet, the best play is generally to 4bet jam all in, knowing full well that you might be facing KK or AA, but that there is some small chance that you're up against TT, JJ, AQ, AK. This is obviously an oversimplification at best, but it is a very common scenario (and actually kind of a dream scenario especially if there are people cold calling the 3-bets in between giving you dead money, which often happens at the low stakes). You have to go to the casino excited to bet $300 on your QQ because you know that it is a +EV play. Even though most of the time you're going to lose, you'll win enough of the time to make it worth your while.

    Next time you are dealt AKo in MP1 and UTG raises to 15 in front of you, realize that if you 3bet to 45, there is some chance that everyone folds and you take down the $20 in the pot. If that happens around 2/3 times, then your 3bet is automatically profitable! Now when he does call, he doesn't have AA. This means that you have at least 30% equity in the pot at the very worst, if he has KK. Most of the time you are flipping a coin or you are ahead, which basically means you get your money back and possibly some of his money. 30% of the time you are going to flop top pair top kicker or better and just absolutely print money. So the whole 3-bet thing is just an investment. Now back to your example: you get called, and you now are playing a $90 pot with AKo and the flop is Q85r. When you bet $30 into that pot, if he folds just over 25% of the time, that bet is automatically profitable! Zero players at 1-2 are opening the correct ranges, zero players are calling 3-bets with the correct ranges, and zero players are continuing with the correct ranges. Just ask yourself, would he fold 25% of the hands he would open and then call my 3-bet with? I think that generally the answer is yes, and even if he does call, you are still beating many of the straight draw hands he might call with. Logically, the correct play is then to c-bet. Obviously this is another oversimplification, but my point is that if you really analyze each of these decisions as a mathematical probability in a vacuum, each one of them makes perfect sense. You just have to make the correct decision over and over and over again enough times so that the one time that you get lucky, it pays for all of the time when you got unlucky.

    Every decision you make in poker is an investment. Nothing is certain except the math. Once you understand a particular situation, you can translate it to a probability and then ask yourself which action is the most worthwhile investment.
  • CycleV Posts: 811Subscriber
    I know you are earnest and really want to improve your game, and I appreciate that. But there's no way I'm reading through 2 walls of text entirely. I think I made it tho this quote of yours, where I disagree with almost everything yo said:

    "Key notes: We must always enter the pot with a raise. There is a 70% chance of missing the flop with an unpaired hand. As the preflop raiser and in position we should be able to continuation bet and take down the pot a large portion of the time. We do not want to have a capped range."

    1. You can limp over multiple limpers in some situations. Especially at LLSNL (live low stakes no limit). T8s otb, baby pairs, and imo suited wheels (A5s-A2s), cuz you can flush over flush pople for huge pots with little investment.
    2. "Missing the flop" in your mind means not making a pair. But flopping 8+ outs is not missing the flop in the CLP world. 3. Following up, we can c-bet CORRECTLY even if we don't always take it down on the flop, because we can pick up equity and continue to run a semibluff on the turn. However, when a pot goes 4+ ways, we should never expect to win "a large portion of the time" as you say.
    4. In LLSNL 95% or more of your V's aren't thinking about if your range is capped, so you worrying about it is counterproductive. When I was starting at 1/3, from EP I opened AJo+, suited BW, 77+. By the time I moved on to 2/5, I had actually TIGHTENED that range. Now my UTG opens have a couple of SC but no AJo, and depending on the table no 77 or QTs.

    I've said this in other spots, there should be warning labels on all preflop charts. At 1/3 with usually less than 100BB effective, important parts of the chart don't help (imo).
  • OMGitsWorm Posts: 272SubscriberProfessional
    Every decision you make in poker is an investment. Nothing is certain except the math. Once you understand a particular situation, you can translate it to a probability and then ask yourself which action is the most worthwhile investment.

    Well said philc.
  • Huck7 Posts: 8Subscriber
    @CycleV

    Sorry mate, I know that I can talk more than a just little.

    Especially-so when it comes to Poker theory. I will try to shorten up my posts as best I can.

    In regards to your critique regarding the below quote:

    "We must always enter the pot with a raise. There is a 70% chance of missing the flop with an unpaired hand. As the preflop raiser and in position we should be able to continuation bet and take down the pot a large portion of the time. We do not want to have a capped range."

    I am not qualified to speak as to the veracity of the statement as a whole.

    You will have to take it up with Mr @kilee

    Everything within that quote, word for word (hence the quotation marks) has come directly from his [Introduction to PreFlop Fundamentals] course.

    I’ve listened to what it is he has said and simply transcribed the key-notes for safe-keeping and review.

    I am just a lowly scribe.

    Of course there are exceptions to every rule, and exceptions which can disprove any rule.

    He goes on later within the course and talks about over-limping as an option and when we can break the cardinal imperatives. Making adjustments based on game texture, flow, stack sizes, who is to our left, who is in the blinds etc…

    But I assume for the most part, he is speaking directly to us Newbie’s who don’t have a clue and attempting to give us a simple enough framework to build-upon. It's both a theoretical and an ideal world, until of course, it isn't.

    I am going to have to re-read over the rest of your email at least 2-3 more times as there seems to be a wealth of information there which will help me in the short, medium and long term. You really know your stuff.

    Thanks for the contribution and hope to learn as much as I can from you and everybody else moving forward.

    Cheers,

    Huck
  • Huck7 Posts: 8Subscriber
    @philc

    Pretty freaking impressive given you were self-aware at the time and able to (a) cut yourself off for a short while (b) regroup and commit to study (c) win back all of your losses and emerge a winning player.

    This is very similar to my own trajectory. Well, as far as scaling back play slightly and committing more to study.

    I am still a losing player. I have resolved to study and evolve and develop my game and a lot of the better players in here have turned me onto online play/low stakes so that I can get my reps up and test out game theory/plug leaks.

    Boy is Poker a hard game!

    Thank you for opening up and giving me some insight into your development.

    Your POV and experience, especially because it was so recent, really is inspiring.

    “It's important to understand that whatever money you put on the table must be OK to lose” – philc

    I think this is most definitely what I was having trouble coming to terms with.

    But after the great response from you and everybody else in here I can now see my way past any fear.

    If I make the right play pre-flop or post flop and lose my stack then, so be it.

    I will re-up and wait for my next opportunity.

    You are absolutely correct in your observations of both me and the game at low stakes. I was being a chicken-shit. There are people cold calling 3-bets and giving away dead money and yes I should be attempting to capitalize. There are a tonne of mistakes being made and I should be looking to maneuver and fight for pots much more often (villain and situation dependent, of course).

    I’ll keep studying and keeping working away and try my best to make the +EV play at the right time.

    FYI, I have printed the below and it’s now staring me right in the face every time I sit down to work on my off-table game.

    “If you really analyze each of these decisions as a mathematical probability in a vacuum, each one of them makes perfect sense. You just have to make the correct decision over and over and over again enough times so that the one time that you get lucky, it pays for all of the time when you got unlucky.

    Every decision you make in poker is an investment. Nothing is certain except the math. Once you understand a particular situation, you can translate it to a probability and then ask yourself which action is the most worthwhile investment.” – philc


    Thanks again and look forward to hearing more from your re results and progress.

    Huck
  • CycleV Posts: 811Subscriber
    I didn't know that was a quote from Ki, I haven't used the curriculum in a long while. So you should probably ignore my advice and go with Ki's, though for the 1/3 I remember I can't imagine all of it would have been helpful. GL
  • KiLeeKiLee Posts: 249Pro
    @huck7
    I think that you are indeed battling a mental hurdle. You are only thinking and fearing what you can lose, and not what you can win. You went through this elaborate math of how much you can miss and lose, but you didn't take into account how you can win some big pots. The logic is not linear here. Also, you are thinking too much "polar" in a sense where you think of hands as "made" hands or "missed" hands. This is also erroneous. Yes, AA is a "made" hand in the traditional sense. But did you know that it only has about 50% equity on 567dd board vs a BTN calling range? So is it really a made hand? We should be looking at hands in terms of having equity rather than "having hit" or "having missed" You can "miss the flop" with KQss in a sense where you don't have pair, but what if you have a FD? a SD? or BDFD and over cards? You see, it's not so black and white. You can hit a "pair" or have a pocket pair in your hand but flop poor. You can have KK and flop an ace. You can have 67hh but flop a gustshot and a FD.
    A lot of your fear is not really rational. I would suggest playing in stakes where you are comfortable with the variance and notice that your fear is unwarranted.

    Below are the hands that you listed. I would've done something different in every hands except #6 and #7. Fold those 2. The other hands are all VERY CLEAR raise/3bet. #4 is a call. I can't imagine folding AQo after 3 limpers(we need to change this ASAP)

    1. Folded 108s on the B with 3 limpers before me.
    2. Folded A8s in the CO with 3 limpers in front.
    (Reg behind me raised to $26 after I folded).
    3. Folded AJo UTG.
    4. Folded 98s in the BB to a MP open of $10
    5. Called a $15 RFI (and did not 3bet) AKo in MP
    (Folded flop to cbet: Q85r).
    6. Folded QJo in EP with no RFI.
    7. Folded A7o on the B with 2 callers to an EP $10 open
    (Flop: Ac 10s Js Turn: 5d).
    8. Folded AQo in MP after 3 limpers.
    (Board: K72r) (so I probably would have folded to a cbet even had I opened).
  • Chester Drafman Posts: 35Subscriber
    Huck, I think you are having trouble accepting a few truths about poker.
    1. “Poker is pain”
    2. “Poker is pain”
    3. We choose our own problems in life.

    Losing is going to hurt sometimes. You have to come to terms with that. It’s part of the game. I’ve driven home from the casino in pain hundreds of times. The pain usually goes away in an hour. I’ve forgotten the specifics of 98% of those days. It’s a joke. One of my mantras now is. “I’m going to forget about this.”
    Your job is to play better when you’re in pain compared to your opponents. Make it one of your best edges.

    Poker comes with its own benefits and detriments. So does working in an office for a crappy boss. So does starting your own business. We choose our own problems in life.
  • PotLuckNeeded Posts: 53SubscriberProfessional
    Chester Drafman said:
    Huck, I think you are having trouble accepting a few truths about poker.
    1. “Poker is pain”
    2. “Poker is pain”
    3. We choose our own problems in life.

    Losing is going to hurt sometimes. You have to come to terms with that. It’s part of the game. I’ve driven home from the casino in pain hundreds of times. The pain usually goes away in an hour. I’ve forgotten the specifics of 98% of those days. It’s a joke. One of my mantras now is. “I’m going to forget about this.”
    Your job is to play better when you’re in pain compared to your opponents. Make it one of your best edges.

    Poker comes with its own benefits and detriments. So does working in an office for a crappy boss. So does starting your own business. We choose our own problems in life.
    Yes!!!!!!!!!!

    Up until a few years ago, I avoided making thin value bets. I would have 101 different justifications but ultimately it was to avoid the pain. I didn't want to look stupid in front of others, I didn't want to be wrong, I didn't want to get involved in marginal situations. I would sit there and think 'why bother, I'll just wait for better spots'. It was only until I learned to embrace the pain that I started growing as a player.



  • PotLuckNeeded Posts: 53SubscriberProfessional
    As I mentioned in chat, work through:

    - Curriculum / Crushing No Limit Holdem
    - Curriculum / Fast Track
    - Play very low stakes at sites like Ignition

    Slow, very slow.

    - Mental Game - Jared Tindler (do the labs)


    You'll end up in a completely different headspace once you complete that journey.
  • Huck7 Posts: 8Subscriber
    edited March 28
    Apologies regarding the late response but I've been snowed under.

    Let me assure everyone that I'm well on my way to conquering the issues at hand and I'm making progress.

    There's only about a million additional levels to tackle after this one. No big deal.

    I've read and reread over the IM's from the crew as well as the posts within this forum half a dozen times, at least.

    It's not what you can lose, it's what you can win. Variance and losses and dwindling stacks are just a part of the game and I'll deal with it.

    The next time I have AQo or AK and the circumstances permit me to do so and it's the right configuration I'll be in there raising or 3betting and giving them hell.

    Not to mention all the other playable hands we've got in our range.

    Thanks to all for the feedback and support.

    I'm grateful that I've got the content and the community here at CLP to fall back on and for keeping me on the right path.

    @OMGitsWorm
    @Chester Drafman
    @KiLee
    @JesseTheSuit
    @PotLuckNeeded

    I'm taking the advice and entering into 0.5/0.10 NL via Ignition and I'll work out the kinks as best I can.

    @philc
    @Rysher8

    Haven't forgotten about you guys.

    I'm taking the rest of the advice and adding it to the playbook.

    Now that I've gotten to some of the post-flop material within the FT course I can already see how much of my fear truly was unwarranted (as Ki so eloquently phrased his assessment).

    I'm feeling much better about things.

    I can only imagine just how much sharper I'll feel 5 years from now. And then 5 years after that. Still a long way to go that's for sure.

    I'll continue to expand my comfort zone and I'm working off table as much as I possibly can.

    Onwards and upwards fellas.

    I'll keep you all posted and continue to ask as many questions as I can.

    Cheers,

    Huck
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