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All in blind from a drunk guy - what's your play?

RecreationalRogerRecreationalRoger Posts: 789Subscriber
edited November -1 in NLHE Strategy Discussion
All

I've never seen this before:

1-2 NL game at Parx Sunday morning. We had just opened the table at 11 AM. Around 11:30 the 5 seat leaves. I'm in the 6 move over to the 5 (easier for me to see the flop). A young drunk (I'm assuming been up all night) saunters over and says, "who wants to flip for stacks?" We think he's joking, until he sits down and puts his $169 across the line.

I'm UTG+2 which makes him UTG+3 (he took my seat).

Not quite knowing the rules, the UTG and me clarify with the dealer and the floor - if we don't change the action (so either fold, or call the $2 BB), then he's committed. If either one of us raises then he'd have the option to pull back his bet.

UTG folds, I look down at K6o. What's my play?

Roger

Comments

  • whatsyourplay? Posts: 752Member
    I've seen that situation. Some guys just need to gamble it up to get some adrenaline, I guess.
    A similar siuation can arise if you have a maniac to your left, who does not flip for his stack but raises basically every hand.
    In both cases, it makes sense to limp or flatcall with strong hands, let him raise (or in your example: ship his whole stack with ATC), watch what the other guys are doing, and then decide if you want to call/raise if possible.

    If he really flips without looking at his cards, you theoretically should call with any hand that is better that 50% of hands. If I remember correctly, that is Q7o and better. But that assumes that you
    - have the required bankroll to stand variance (the manica might want to gamble multiple times!)
    - are not prone to tilt after loosing (the maniac might leave after the doubled up!?, or you might loose multiple times)
    - don't give up EV for other reasons, e.g. because you have a deep stack and position to a weaker player with also a deep stack, so loosing to the maniac would hurt you because you can't stack the bad player anymore.

    The scenario you described is interesting wrt seating because it's a rare example where having the player you want to stack to your direct LEFT is actually the best case.
  • Fish Fryer Posts: 161Member
    RogerHardy said

    All

    I've never seen this before:

    1-2 NL game at Parx Sunday morning. We had just opened the table at 11 AM. Around 11:30 the 5 seat leaves. I'm in the 6 move over to the 5 (easier for me to see the flop). A young drunk (I'm assuming been up all night) saunters over and says, "who wants to flip for stacks?" We think he's joking, until he sits down and puts his $169 across the line.

    I'm UTG+2 which makes him UTG+3 (he took my seat).

    Not quite knowing the rules, the UTG and me clarify with the dealer and the floor - if we don't change the action (so either fold, or call the $2 BB), then he's committed. If either one of us raises then he'd have the option to pull back his bet.

    UTG folds, I look down at K6o. What's my play?

    Roger
    I'd only call with the upper end of hands if I was in late position and knew it would be HU. IMHO, anything else is just spewing money.
  • WackabrewWackabrew Posts: 400Subscriber
    call the $2, see what everyone else does, and if it folds back to you, call the all in. You're ahead 60/40 against a 100% range. Then again, I embrace the variance.
  • ThehammahThehammah Posts: 7,090Subscriber
    It depends on how well some players are playing but I would just let this one go in this spot. K6 does well against the rest of the field but if someone realizes their equity they could be shoving with say 33s and you would have to fold .. so just move on to the next hand. That said if no one is doing this then maybe a limp is worth it since its likely no one else will come along..

    That said I got into a really large pot (over 220bbs) in a 2-5 game at 100-300 buy in when a player I had put on tilt decided to shove almost 200 blind. One guy called with about 300 behind and another guy called all in. I was in the sb and looked and saw pocket 10s. Now I thought I was probabaly way ahead of everyones range or flipping with the guy who flatted first. Given the overlay I thought it was worth it if he had overs.

    I won the pot unimproved.. So these types of situations can be very profitable BUT you must understand they are much higher variance and you have to accept this and not go on tilt yourself. If you would then I would just pass on this

    Wendy
  • RecreationalRogerRecreationalRoger Posts: 789Subscriber
    I agree with wackabrew (and as I was typing up the original post, I realized that was the correct play).

    I have no problem playing for 169 with K6o against a random hand. And once the UTG folds, I can call the $2, knowing that everyone else has to act on the 169 before me. If anyone calls I'm out; if everyone folds I ship.

    He had 95o. Fishy player in the 9 seat picked him off with AT0. Fishy player then proceeded to eventually lose all his money to players not named Roger :)

    Roger
  • WackabrewWackabrew Posts: 400Subscriber
    whatsyourplay? actually makes a great point on this one by the way...you always want to be directly on the maniac's right. There are a few players at Parx that are there to esentially play bingo, and one in particular who makes it 17 pre-flop (1/2 game) every single hand. I will always limp my entire pre-flop raising range against this player. You get one or two people to call the 17 and then you can make it $60. maniac will obviously always call and typically unless the callers in the field have real hands they will always fold because $60 is a huge bet pre-flop in 1/2 and no one is paying attention to the fact that you are only doing this to iso the maniac. I'm esentially doing this with K10s+, A10o+. Make it $100 if you hit any piece of the flop. Ride variance train. Profit.
  • LarryLido Posts: 52Member
    My rule of thumb for calling blind all ins is King high, but with this much action behind you this is a fold.
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