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Simple things to remember to make you a better NL player

dannydeuces Posts: 239Member
edited November 2014 in NLHE Strategy Discussion
Not breaking any new ground here - just trying to get a running list of simple things to remember when in a session that will make you a better NL player and hopefully more profitable.

I will start:

- Always look to your left before acting. This will provide you with the opportunity to see if players behind you are interested in the hand, going to fold, etc. and you can respond accordingly (i.e. float/raise in a spot you typically would not, etc.).
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Comments

  • TDF Posts: 1,130Subscriber
    Know stack sizes of all active players before flop is delt.
  • TDF Posts: 1,130Subscriber
    Know size of the pot at any given time.
  • doubletap Posts: 166Subscriber
    i actually have a hard time with stack sizes and pot, whats your method for adding up pot? do you count the bets as they go in, to the math at the end before the flop comes out? sometimes I try to follow the action, and do the math then my head starts to hurt.
  • workinghard Posts: 1,573Subscriber
    edited November 2014
    doubletap said:
    i actually have a hard time with stack sizes and pot, whats your method for adding up pot? do you count the bets as they go in, to the math at the end before the flop comes out? sometimes I try to follow the action, and do the math then my head starts to hurt.
    this is something I'm working on getting better at. There are a lot of standard size bets pre flop and on the flop. So, I would suggest getting really good at sizing up the pot when it's your turn on the flop- even if you don't intend to act. When it's your turn to act on the flop, you can add up all the sum of the flop bets so far to the sum of the preflop. Round everything to the nearest $5 to keep it easy.
  • luckyspewy Posts: 299Member
    PAY ATTENTION TO SHOWDOWNS! Don't just log the info as in "hmmm he played 93suited, that's bad" Retrace the hand after showdowns happen, in order to understand the leaks in a persons game. This happens so much online, but I dont see it stressed enough for live play. Did he call a 3b oop? Did he or she limp a strong hand? Did they triple barrel? All this adds up to give you an idea of a players approach to the game, and tendencies towards nittyness or spewyness.

    A lot of time I see, and even on this site, players cite that the villain in the hand is a fish, or bad loose passive, but we need evidence to support that.

  • workinghard Posts: 1,573Subscriber
    Pick a player you are going to focus on. Preferably a reg. Every hand s/he is in focus on the action and what that player does
  • SunFish Posts: 22Subscriber
    edited November 2014
    doubletap said:
    i actually have a hard time with stack sizes and pot, whats your method for adding up pot? do you count the bets as they go in, to the math at the end before the flop comes out? sometimes I try to follow the action, and do the math then my head starts to hurt.
    Simple just pay attention to the bets and multiply then add.

    Preflop raise to 25 3 callers 25 x 3
    Flop: $75
    Flop bet 55 1 call 55 x 2 110
    Turn $185
    River bet 125 + 185
    River $310

    I don't worry about the minute details like if the blinds folded or subtracting the rake, that can make your head hurt eventually. Ball park like this is good enough.

    by 119ki
  • DavidTuchman Posts: 790Pro
    Take your fucking headphones out of your ear and take your eyes off your Ipad! ...be social, fun and pay attention to the game you're playing in.

  • dannydeuces Posts: 239Member
    Try to get to the left of the big stacks because money moves clockwise.
  • StarwarsJediMasterStarwarsJediMaster Posts: 741Subscriber
    -position
    -hand selection
    -aggression
    -always stay focused
    -mindful of your image, and how your playing (tired,tilt)
    -develop reads ASAP( keep your eyes peeled)
    -seat selection ( get a seat change button)
    -be patient and don't force the action
    - take your time with a value hand to make sure you make the optimal bet size
    - 15/25/35/ rule **especially in capped games with bad players**
    - bet folding/ raise folding
    - don't get fancy with value hands
    -Quit when the game sucks
    - eat before you start a session and drink lots of water
  • DrGambol Posts: 724Subscriber
    Targeting the fish is a good thing. But be careful to not having this turn into targeting fish and avoiding regulars. Most regs are tight and super exploitable in a ton of spots. If you're not taking advantage of their extremely unbalanced strategies they use, you're leaving money on the table. Most regs cap their ranges or make bet sizes that turn their hand face up. We cannot limit our exploitative play to only fish but need to attack weak regs when we get the chance.

    In the same line of thought, consider every option before making a play. There may be plenty of times where you can rep nothing and win simply because people cap their range and play passively towards large bets. Don't count out the weird lines, like c/r as the preflop raiser, donk betting or overbetting. Many of these strange lines may be the most profitable line for value or as a bluff. If you limit your play to just betting 2/3rd pot or c/f, then you will be too weak, exploitable, and not taking advantage of a lot of good spots to pick up and extra pot when bluffing or add some extra value.
  • dpbuckdpbuck Posts: 2,055Subscriber
    I keep this in a note on my phone, and refer to it regularly when I play. I call this my "Poker Manifesto". It centers a bit more about the mental side of the game rather than specific strategy, but has helped me stay focused when playing:

    1) Take frequent breaks, at least every 30 minutes. Leave the poker room, go outside and get some fresh air, at least for five minutes.
    2) On every decision after the initial pre-flop action, take at least five seconds to act. No rash decisions.
    3) Put villains on ranges of hands. Actually verbalize it in your head, like you're training someone on how to play this hand.
    4) When you lose a big pot, evaluate your mindset. Don't be afraid to cash out.
    5) Big bets on the river are never bluffs. Don't be a hero.
    6) You're not going to win every pot. It's okay to fold sometimes.
    7) If things aren't going your way, tighten up. Don't loosen up.
    8) Before making a big bet, count the pot.
    9) Small hand = Small Pot.
    10) Have fun. If you're frustrated, sad, or just not enjoying yourself, cash out. There will be other poker games. You don't have to play this game.
  • neverlearn2 Posts: 2,862Subscriber
    Don't drink alcohol while playing.

    Don't bet people at their own game

    Don't splash the pot
  • Arenzano Posts: 1,464Subscriber
    Learn to accept bad beats and suck outs
  • luckyspewy Posts: 299Member
    Don't eat oreos at the table... It's a tell.
  • CalgaryPokerGuy Posts: 342Subscriber
    edited December 2014
    Don't check-call the river! Such a huge leak.. Why? You always miss the value when you're ahead, and you're paying off the hands that have you beat.

    Caveat: There is a very profitable time to check-call, when you're fairly positive the caller is on a draw that has missed and he/she's prone to bluffing. I make a special point to check to get this extra bet, they add up! Another one is betting ridiculously small (like 1/10th pot), makes the player's brain explode resulting in chips spewing into the pot, folding to 1/10th pot bet just doesn't seem like a good option to them...
  • fishcake Posts: 1,002Subscriber
    dpbuck said:
    I keep this in a note on my phone, and refer to it regularly when I play. I call this my "Poker Manifesto". It centers a bit more about the mental side of the game rather than specific strategy, but has helped me stay focused when playing:

    1) Take frequent breaks, at least every 30 minutes. Leave the poker room, go outside and get some fresh air, at least for five minutes.
    2) On every decision after the initial pre-flop action, take at least five seconds to act. No rash decisions.
    3) Put villains on ranges of hands. Actually verbalize it in your head, like you're training someone on how to play this hand.
    4) When you lose a big pot, evaluate your mindset. Don't be afraid to cash out.
    5) Big bets on the river are never bluffs. Don't be a hero.
    6) You're not going to win every pot. It's okay to fold sometimes.
    7) If things aren't going your way, tighten up. Don't loosen up.
    8) Before making a big bet, count the pot.
    9) Small hand = Small Pot.
    10) Have fun. If you're frustrated, sad, or just not enjoying yourself, cash out. There will be other poker games. You don't have to play this game.
    Good advice generally but the first two are going a bit far. If I took a break every 30 mins I'd feel like robocop. I like to actually be at the table playing. Taking 5 seconds every decision is also unnecessary, especially if you have already planned what to do while your opponent is still acting.
  • dpbuckdpbuck Posts: 2,055Subscriber
    fishcake said:
    Good advice generally but the first two are going a bit far. If I took a break every 30 mins I'd feel like robocop. I like to actually be at the table playing. Taking 5 seconds every decision is also unnecessary, especially if you have already planned what to do while your opponent is still acting.
    I find myself so much sharper and able to play longer sessions when I take frequent breaks. Overkill? Maybe, but it's been working for me. YMMV.

    As for #2, yes, if it is a clear fold (Ex: black 5s on AKTdd multiway), I don't take my time to fold. It is just a reminder to think things through and act rationally. I have had a tendency to act too quickly, and that is a reminder to slow down.
  • floppedawheel Posts: 1,063Subscriber
    never stop thinking about table selection. your game that was once good might not be anymore. and your game that is good now might not be the best game. keep your eyes open around the room. complacency in this can be really costly.... if you're sitting on 500BB and have an ideal image, different story. but you should still consider a change if another table is especially juicy.
  • estacosanostra Posts: 44Subscriber
    Don't educate bad players.
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