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Crush Live Call-Ins: No.39 WSOP Week 1

BartBart Posts: 5,887AdministratorLeadPro
This week Bart takes some phones calls regarding tournament strategy at the WSOP, a nlhe and PLO hand and a bankroll question.

http://www.crushlivepoker.com/podcasts/2015-wsop-week-1
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  • flyingtriangleflyingtriangle Posts: 101Subscriber
    edited June 2015
    I thought the caller’s question about traveling with cash was an interesting one. Bart’s advice - that he wouldn’t worry about it if it’s under $20k-$40k and you keep it on your person - is probably sound in the vast, vast majority of cases. But abuse of civil asset forfeiture by law enforcement has become a huge problem in the U.S., and under the current state of the law in many states all it takes is one cop noticing that you have a large amount of cash on you and you can be really, really screwed.

    I just came across this story today about a farmer who had $16k seized from his vehicle in a traffic stop. They suspected him of drug trafficking (a drug dog apparently alerted on his vehicle), and even though no drugs were found, no charges were filed, and there was no evidence whatsoever to connect the guy to the narcotics trade, the cops still kept his money. What’s even worse is that they used the guy's money to fund their new K-9 program, presumably so they can get more drug dogs to make more false alerts and allow seizure of even more assets from innocent people.

    And then there’s this kid, who committed the unspeakable offense of attempting to travel by train from Michigan to California carrying an envelope with $16k in it, and another guy who tried to get away with moving across country with $2,400 in cash on him. Cops stole the money from both, with no evidence of any illegal activity of any kind. The guy with the $2.4k eventually got his money back, but only after spending over $1,200 on attorney’s fees. The kid with the $16k still hasn’t seen a cent.

    According to that article, the average value of state forfeiture cases in California in 2013 was just $5,145.

    What’s really troubling is that the burden of proof in civil forfeiture cases is often on the victim to prove that the seized property was not connected with illegal activity. In many cases this can be an impossible burden to meet. I mean, I’ve got $60 in my wallet right now, and if you asked me to prove that I didn’t acquire it by selling drugs, I don’t know what I’d be able to show you. I could pull out my pay stub to show I have legitimate income, but that still doesn’t prove that this specific cash didn’t come from illegal activity.

    I’m looking at a case right now where a woman had $2,100 seized from the home she shared with her boyfriend. To be fair, there was methamphetamine found in the house, and so the cops jumped to the conclusion that any money on the premises was connected with the sale of illegal drugs. After the seizure, the woman came to court with documentation and a sworn statement showing that she acquired the money through her house cleaning business, and even identified several specific customers as the source of the cash. The court said that information was not specific enough - that because the woman couldn’t show the exact dates she earned the money or provide evidence of what specific house cleaning work she had done to earn it (keep in mind at least six months had passed between when she acquired the money and when she finally got before a court), she had no claim to get any of the money back.

    I could probably go on for a few more pages about the problems with civil asset forfeiture in this country, but the point is we’ve all got good reason to be at least a little bit worried that if we travel with any significant amount of cash we could become the victims of legal robbery at the hands of someone with not just a gun, but a badge as well. And if we should be so unfortunate as to find that happening to us, we can be reasonably assured that the justice system will treat us like we’re the criminal in this situation if we should have the audacity to try to get our money back.
    by 1Bart
  • MrFizzbinMrFizzbin Posts: 356Subscriber
    Dude when old man coffee bets his Ace he has an Ace. Save the 1500 and fold.

    Paying off fish when you know you are beat and drawing to 2 outs is a huge tourney leak. Tourney chips are finite, don't waste them on crap plays.
  • ThehammahThehammah Posts: 7,085Subscriber
    I have two bank accounts.. One is Chase that I got when I first bought my condo in vegas. Its really easy to deposit money here in LA and if needed withdraw it basically anywhere in the US.

    I would have a separate bank for poker and have it be a national one with lots of branches so you can deposit at home where ever that is and if needed withdraw from vegas or where ever you happen to be..

    ww
  • MrFizzbinMrFizzbin Posts: 356Subscriber
    edited June 2015
    Thehammah said:
    I have two bank accounts.. One is Chase that I got when I first bought my condo in vegas. Its really easy to deposit money here in LA and if needed withdraw it basically anywhere in the US.

    I would have a separate bank for poker and have it be a national one with lots of branches so you can deposit at home where ever that is and if needed withdraw from vegas or where ever you happen to be..

    ww
    If it's a large 10-20k sum you may want to let your local branch know a head of time so that when you show up to the remote branch they are aware of what's up, and that they'll have sufficient cash.

    (And by sufficient cash I mean $100.00).

    I went to my local bank before my last WSOP trip and picked up 7500

    They weren't sure they had enough to 100's


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