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Bankroll Management

pk Posts: 6Subscriber
Hey guys, Im not sure if this would be the right subforum for this topic. But I couldnt see any others.

My question is - If I have 20-30 buy ins ~3000$ bankroll for 1/2. In one session when should I stand up and leave after loosing x amount of buy ins?

Im having a little trouble with my bankroll management and I was wondering what everyones opinion is for this because I know we all have those big down swings.

Regards,

pk

Comments

  • ACK Posts: 428Subscriber
    Stand up when you start feeling frustrated/tilted. This point is different for everyone.

    Don't focus on building a bankroll when you play 1/2 because for part-time players winning $5-$15 per hour your bankroll will grow so slowly.

    All your focus should be on improving, getting money from your job/savings, moving up to stakes where you can make real $$.
  • pk Posts: 6Subscriber
    edited June 2015
    ACK said:
    Stand up when you start feeling frustrated/tilted. This point is different for everyone.

    Don't focus on building a bankroll when you play 1/2 because for part-time players winning $5-$15 per hour your bankroll will grow so slowly.

    All your focus should be on improving, getting money from your job/savings, moving up to stakes where you can make real $$.
    What stakes would that be?

    And thank you for responding
  • ACK Posts: 428Subscriber
    Whatever $/h makes it really worthwhile for you. Some people are happy with $20/h some $50/h.

    Probably 2/5 or 5/5 is the stake where $25+/h is made.
  • FreeLunch Posts: 1,308Pro
    edited June 2015
    The math: if your properly rolled then it does not matter how stuck you get in a session (you are not properly rolled)

    The psychology: Humans are really bad at being self aware of their decision process so you may well be tilted or not playing well and not know it. Even if you are on the top of your game - your image is crushed and you have lost a lot of the tools that make you profitable.

    I used to be in the camp "if the game is good leave it". For the most part I now suggest a 3bi stop loss for most people and stick to it myself. While there are days when I hit my loss, am playing fine and should stay, I think there are probably more days where I leave and look back on the session and realize I was not at my best. Even when I am sharp - there is a huge advantage to a winning image. This goes beyond the specific table and moment you are in. If over time your opponents think you win most sessions you have a whole bunch more tools to work with. (This also gets to why if you take bad beats you have to be cheery and positive about it as you dont want people to remember them or view you as impacted by them)
  • tensor0910 Posts: 123Subscriber
    I think ack summed it up nicely. It all depends on the individual. If you feel like you can s till play your A game while being in the hole then by all means keep playing. The standard stop loss is usually 2 BI, but if you're just starting out I would lean towards calling it a day after 1.
  • FreeLunch Posts: 1,308Pro
    1BI stop loss? If I notice someone doing that (and many do because they bring their life roll to the table and is only one BI) then I will destroy them in the long run as they will be really easy to read and bluff.
  • mythomaniac Posts: 284Subscriber
    FreeLunch said:
    1BI stop loss? If I notice someone doing that (and many do because they bring their life roll to the table and is only one BI) then I will destroy them in the long run as they will be really easy to read and bluff.
    +1

    You need to be comfortable having at least two bullets on you. Not that it will happen often at $1-2 but sometimes lines don't make sense and you have to call or go with your gut and get it in. If you only have one buy in you will either end up being scared money or be too interested in trying to just double up before going for thin value or double barreling.

    I usually bring two buy ins with me and only dig deeper (no ATM fees for me) if I'm getting sucked out on in a REALLY good game. Other than that I really have to ask myself if it's worth it to buy back in.
  • Bonezy Posts: 82Subscriber
    its all personal. I play 1/3 mostly. I started out about a year ago on a short roll like you. I would bring 2bi max a first and was able to grow my roll. Then I began to bring 3bi with me once I felt ok with where my roll was at. It took me about a year to realize that 3bi was bad for me personally, becausse once I got in the game for 2bi my third bi would usually get dusted off pretty fast. It was a mental block for me to where I was playing well for my first two bi but once I hit my third I was playing very poorly and almost always would lose it all. Since I realized this I have gone back to my bi level and have been doing well. It all personal and you have to figure out what works for you. If you are starting out I would recommend 2bi and no more.
  • N8g Posts: 14Subscriber
    I play 2/5. I keep 3-4 BI on me when I go to play a solid session. I have found that tilt control is the absolute most important thing when it comes to my game and BR mgmt. I need to be comfortable getting it in good and losing. I'm probably in a good game if that happens. To be comfortable I need multiple bullets. I will go deeper than 3 if the game is really good but it is really important to step back and asses my mental state when getting that deep. I can't tell you how much my tilt threshold has improved sense I've been sitting on a comfortable BR. I have about a 40 BI poker BR and a job.

    Hope this makes sense and helps.
  • workinghard Posts: 1,561Subscriber
    I need to be comfortable getting it in good and losing
    Yup. I totally agree.
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